AWAKENING COMPASSION

 

 

 

 

 

The practice of lojong or “mind training” to transform difficulties into knowledge is a skillset that can be learned over time with daily practice.   Painful emotions  are  stepping stones to wisdom, compassion and fearlessness.

When I connect to something painful, I want it to flow, to  be released. I don’t to project this onto others, nor do I wish to suppress strong emotions such as anger, fear and pain because I know feelings pass, when we let them.

 Pain is a message to  open up the heart. When I breathe in, I am opening my heart. Allowing the pain space to experience what it is, rather than automatically expressing pain which escalates into anger.

A Gyan Mudra is a conscious  connection to the mind and body. A powerful way of being anchored in the present moment is to  touch the tip of the thumb to the tip of the index finger, with the other three fingers stretched out. The Gyan Mudra  enhances the knowledge. There is no particular time duration for this mudra. You can practice by sitting, standing or lying on bed whenever and wherever you have time to  increases memory power and sharpens the brain, and  enhance concentration. Perfect for awareness.   

The Gayatri Mantra is the universal prayer enshrined in the Vedas, is  the most powerful of Sanskrit mantras.  Chanting brings happiness into my  life and rescues me from pain and adversity.Breathing is the kindest, most compassionate action I can do- deep breathing in and out. 

Om Bhur Bhuvaḥ Swaḥ
Tat-savitur Vareñyaṃ
Bhargo Devasya Dhīmahi
Dhiyo Yonaḥ Prachodayāt

General meaning: We meditate on  God as we understand God. the creator, whose effulgence (divine light) illumines all realms (physical, mental and spiritual). May this divine light illumine our intellect.

Om: Universal  sound. Bhur: our essential being.  Bhuvah: life force.  Suvah: subtle Tat:  Truth  Savitur: the Sun.  Vareñyam: devotion. ; Bhargo: effulgence  Devasya: supreme being.  Dhīmahi: meditate; Dhiyo: the mind. ; Yo: May this light; Nah: our; Prachodayāt: illumine/inspire.

The Gayatri – it is a universal prayer. It has three parts, meditation on the glory of God as the illumination immanent in the three worlds – upper, middle and lower (Om Bhur Bhuva Swah; Tat Savitur Vareñyam); it has smaraña or picturisation of the Grace (Bhargo Devasya Dhīmahi) and prārthanā, prayer for compassion for the sake of liberation, through awakening of intelligence that pervades entire universe, not to any particular name or form of that intelligence; and so, all can use it and be saved by it. There can be no fanaticism, no hatred, no rivalry, if the Gayatri is adhered to, its pious repetition will clarify the passions and promote love.[‘Sathya Sai Speaks’, vol 07.37: October, 13, 1967]

The Vedic tradition of knowledge, based on the extensive Vedic literature, is the oldest tradition of knowledge in the world. Though it has been long preserved in India, this traditional wisdom has been almost lost in recent centuries—due in part to repeated foreign invasions. The Vedic tradition includes detailed information on a wide range of topics—from astronomy to music, architecture to health care, administration to economy. But it is all based on the knowledge of consciousness—including technologies of consciousness, and evolution to the highest state of consciousness (enlightenment).

Ancient traditions can enrich our lives, reduce stress, restore calm and connect our essential self to our authentic state of  love and happiness.

 Insight  Mindfulness Meditation    is available to us because we natural  have the capacity to be present, and it doesn’t require us to change who we are. It takes many shapes and goes by many names: attention, awareness, empathy, compassion, being in the zone, situational awareness, presence, flow, contemplation, and many more.
We can cultivate these innate qualities with simple mindfulness practices that are scientifically demonstrated to benefit ourselves—and through our relationships— our loved ones, our friends and neighbours, our co-workers, and the world at large.

Being mindful is part of the zeitgeist, the spirit of the times. It is likely to become a transformative social phenomenon for these key reasons:
Mindfulness is already having an impact in our schools, hospitals, offices, governments, and many other places. It’s helping us to become healthier, to lead more effectively, and to cooperate with each other in making a better world.

 Being mindful cultivates universal human qualities and does not require anyone to change their beliefs. Everyone can benefit and it’s easy to learn. It’s a way of living. Being mindful brings awareness and caring into everything we do—and it cuts down needless stress. Even a little makes our lives better.

It’s evidence-based. Both science and experience demonstrate how being mindful brings positive benefits for our health, happiness, work, and relationships. It sparks innovation. As we deal with an increasing complex and uncertain world, being mindful can lead us to effective, resilient, low-cost responses to seemingly intransigent problems.

I want to help you achieve lasting personal and professional success. You have the power to heal yourself, prevent illness, and feel connected to the universal energy around you. This is possible through the practice of mindful insight meditation, hypnotherapy, yoga, and  ayurveda nutrition. I continue to  thrive, am happy and calm   in the immediacy of daily life by practising insight mindful meditation.     

NOW & ZEN

Thousands of years before Western modern medicine provided scientific evidence for the mind-body connection,  India’s  medical doctors  developed Ayurveda, which continues to be one of the world’s most sophisticated and powerful mind-body health systems. More than a mere system of treating illness, Ayurveda is a science of life Ayur:  life.  Veda: science or knowledge provides  life-enhancing  wisdom designed to help people stay vibrant and healthy while realizing their full human potential.

Ayurveda’s guiding principles:

  1.  Mind  and  body are inextricably connected
  2. Mind & Gut connection  has more power to heal and transform the body than the mind. Prevention  from illness  depends upon expanding our own awareness, bringing it into balance, and then extending that balance to the body. This process isn’t as complicated as it may sound.
  3. When I  meditate i am  effortlessly entering  a state of expanded awareness and inner quiet that refreshes the mind and restores balance.
  4. The body is restored/rejuvenated  through the practice of meditation. In the mindset  of restful awareness created through meditation, the  heart rate and breath slows, your body decreases the production of “stress” hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline, and you increase the production of neurotransmitters that enhance wellbeing, including serotonin, dopamine, oxytocin, and endorphins.

Mindfulness Insight Meditation is the new management currency. Mindfulness is available to us because we already have the capacity to be present, and it doesn’t require us to change who we are. It takes many shapes and goes by many names: attention, awareness, empathy, compassion, being in the zone, situational awareness, presence, flow, contemplation, and many more.
We can cultivate these innate qualities with simple mindfulness practices that are scientifically demonstrated to benefit ourselves—and through our relationships— our loved ones, our friends and neighbours, our co-workers, and the world at large.

Being mindful is part of the zeitgeist, the spirit of the times. It is likely to become a transformative social phenomenon for these key reasons:
Mindfulness is already having an impact in our schools, hospitals, offices, governments, and many other places. It’s helping us to become healthier, to lead more effectively, and to cooperate with each other in making a better world.

Being mindful cultivates universal human qualities and does not require anyone to change their beliefs. Everyone can benefit and it’s easy to learn. It’s a way of living. Being mindful brings awareness and caring into everything we do—and it cuts down needless stress. Even a little makes our lives better.

It’s evidence-based. Both science and experience demonstrate how being mindful brings positive benefits for our health, happiness, work, and relationships. It sparks innovation. As we deal with an increasing complex and uncertain world, being mindful can lead us to effective, resilient, low-cost responses to seemingly intransigent problems.